SHINGLES PICTURES

Shingles can appear on any area of your body

The pictures below will help give you an idea of what Shingles can look like. Keep in mind, Shingles may range from mild to severe.

The Shingles rash usually starts as redness or discoloration of the skin and then develops into fluid-filled blisters that generally take 2 to 4 weeks to heal.

Picture of the Shingles Rash that Started With Redness of the Skin and Developed Into Fluid-Filled Blisters
Picture of the Shingles Rash that Started With Redness of the Skin and Developed Into Fluid-Filled Blisters

Although Shingles most commonly occurs on the torso, it can appear anywhere on the body. In this case, the Shingles rash is on the chest.

Picture of a Shingles Rash on the Chest
Picture of a Shingles Rash on the Chest

The rash occurs on one side of the body, which is what’s happening in this mild case of the Shingles rash.

Picture of a Mild Case of the Shingles Rash in a Band or Strip on One Side of the Body
Picture of a Mild Case of the Shingles Rash in a Band or Strip on One Side of the Body

This picture shows a rash around the waist.

Picture of the Shingles Rash of Average Intensity Around the Waistline
Picture of the Shingles Rash of Average Intensity Around the Waistline

This is an example of the Shingles rash, where it can stretch from the middle of the back to the middle of the stomach, but only on one side of the body.

Picture of the Shingles Rash From the Middle of the Back to the Middle of the Stomach on One Side of the Body
Picture of the Shingles Rash From the Middle of the Back to the Middle of the Stomach on One Side of the Body

This is an example of the Shingles rash with some scabbing, which may have been caused by scratching the blisters.

Picture of the Shingles Rash With Some Scabbing, Which May Have Been Caused by Scratching the Blisters
Picture of the Shingles Rash With Some Scabbing, Which May Have Been Caused by Scratching the Blisters

This is what an average case of Shingles can look like on the back.

Picture of an Average Case of Shingles on the Back
Picture of an Average Case of Shingles on the Back

Here is an example of typical Shingles rash on the arm.

Picture of a Typical Shingles Rash on the Arm
Picture of a Typical Shingles Rash on the Arm

This is an example of a severe Shingles rash with a bacterial infection.

Picture of a Severe Shingles Rash With a Bacterial Infection
Picture of a Severe Shingles Rash With a Bacterial Infection

The appearance of a Shingles rash can differ depending on a person’s skin. This rash is more severe than a typical case. In some severe cases, like this one, the Shingles rash may resemble a burn.

Picture of a Severe Shingles Rash That May Resemble a Burn
Picture of a Severe Shingles Rash That May Resemble a Burn

Although not as common as other parts of the body, Shingles blisters can occur around the eye and sometimes in it. This can lead to eye infections and even vision loss.

Although Not as Common as Other Parts of the Body, Here is a Picture of Shingles Blisters Around the Eye, Which Can Lead to Eye Infections and Vision Loss
Although Not as Common as Other Parts of the Body, Here is a Picture of Shingles Blisters Around the Eye, Which Can Lead to Eye Infections and Vision Loss
 


 

Important Safety Information

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please read the accompanying Patient Information for ZOSTAVAX® (Zoster Vaccine Live) and discuss it with your health care professional. The physician Prescribing Information also is available.

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